Dementia

[Quiz] 10 Questions to Differ Dementia From Age Related Memory Loss?

Dementia is a clinical condition whereas the normal aging process that can hamper the memory of the individual. Sometimes people fail to understand the difference between regular aging memory loss with dementia. Today we have arranged 10 questions to identify whether you have dementia or normal age processing memory loss.

Question Number 1

Question Number 1
The kids and grandkids show up for their regular weekly Sunday dinner — and you completely forgot they were coming. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?
Correct Answer
Correct Answer: Warning sign of early dementia “When people start to forget information that they previously would have remembered, that’s worrisome,” says Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. You may be developing mild cognitive impairment, which is often — but not always — a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease. Even if you are eventually diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, take heart. It only means you have an increased risk of developing full dementia. About 50% “convert” within four to five years, Petersen says.

Question Number 2

Question Number 2
You want to ask your neighbor about his daughter, who has just finished her freshman year of college. But you can’t remember her name — until later. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?
Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Normal ageing

The best answer? That tip-of-the-tongue feeling is most likely not a reason to worry. “When word-finding problems are a part of normal ageing, the problem occasionally happens in conversations and the word often ‘comes back’ after a few minutes,” says Kimberly D. Mueller of the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute. With the mild cognitive impairment that kicks off Alzheimer’s disease, she says, these retrieval problems happen frequently and are so disruptive that they make your message hard to convey. Mueller’s new research showed that older adults who tested as cognitively healthy but showed subtle changes in their speech patterns and rate — from using more pronouns instead of the name they can’t remember to peppering conversation with lots of “ums” and “ahhs” as their brain struggles to retrieve a word — were more likely to later advance to mild cognitive decline than those with unchanged speech patterns.

Question Number 3

Dementia

Question Number 3

You sometimes look in the mirror and don’t recognize yourself. It’s the strangest thing. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Warning sign of early dementia

We’re not just talking about being amazed at the crow’s feet, but not knowing your reflection. Difficulty recognizing everyday objects — including your reflection — is an early sign of serious memory loss, according to Michael Rafii, director of the Memory Disorders Clinic at the University of California, San Diego.

Question Number 4

Question Number 4

You always miss the turn to get to the grandkids’ regular soccer field. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Normal age-related memory loss

Consider using the GPS on your phone, but don’t worry that you’re losing your marbles. If you’ve always misplaced your keys or often get distracted while driving, you’re probably just absent-minded. This is usually due to gaps in attention rather than more serious cognitive conditions, and it often worsens with age. Luckily, this is something that can be improved — even when you are older — by working on your brain’s ability to focus. If you’ve always had an incredible sense of direction, but now can’t remember how to get to well-known places, then you may have a problem.

What is the Definition of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It increases in prevalence with age and is rare in people under 45 years. The key clinical feature is the impairment of the ability to remember new information. Hence, patients present with gradual impairment of memory, usually in association with disorders of other cortical functions. Short- and long-term memory are both affected but defects in the former are usually more obvious.

Question Number 5

Question Number 5

You find your glasses in the freezer, your watch in the flowerpot or other objects in strange places. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Warning sign of early dementia

This kind of behaviour may sound humorous, but it’s more troubling than regularly misplacing keys and wallets. If you do find you are misplacing keys, wallets and phones more often — which is common as you age — you may be able to help the problem with more attention to “input,” Petersen says. Decide where these things will go and always put them in the same place. (Like Mom told you long ago.)

Question Number 6

Question Number 6

You’ve always known where every penny was, but now your bills are a complete mess. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Warning sign of early dementia

Problems organizing finances are a common early sign of dementia, Rafii says, and can be a sign that you are starting to have difficulty with executive function — the ability to solve problems. Talk to your doctor and consider finding someone you trust to help with the bills.

Alzheimer’s Day Care

Adult Day Care Centre is necessary for Alzheimer’s patient. You can easily find dementia Day Care Centre near you searching on Google enabling the GPS. In Alzheimer’s Day Care facility they provide various kind of services like counselling services, Nutrition management, Personal care services like toileting, eating etcetera.

They provide various kinds of therapy which include physical occupational or speech therapy. According to Harvard University, elderly individuals that have an active social life may have a slower rate of memory decline.

Question Number 7

Question Number 7

You made a doctor’s appointment for a checkup month ago but completely forgot it – they even charged you $50 for the no-show. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Normal age-related memory loss

Forgetting a doctor’s appointment or hair appointment you made months ago is not a big deal. When you start forgetting about meaningful, important events you normally would have remembered, you should be more concerned, Petersen says. Use the calendar function on your phone to send reminders a day before or keep a wall calendar with appointments in red.

Question Number 8

Question Number 8

Your spouse tells you that you ask the same questions repeatedly. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Warning sign of early dementia

Telling the same stories at every party is fine (if sometimes irritating), but asking the same question or repeating yourself often within the same hour is more troublesome. You may just be distracted or having a bad day, but if you repeatedly forget what you’ve just said, you definitely should talk to your doctor. Family members are often the first to notice serious memory problems, Petersen says, so you should listen to your loved ones.

Question Number 9

Question Number 9

Your mother recently passed away after a long illness. Not only are you sleeping terribly, but you’re also having trouble remembering everything, from meetings with lawyers to where you put her papers. Is it have dementia or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Normal age-related memory loss

Grief, sleep deprivation and the stress of caregiving all wreak havoc on your memory. Although memory problems linked to mental stress and trouble sleeping are not signs of dementia, they are cause for concern. In the long term, all of these do increase the risk for dementia. New research has found that deep sleep, for example, is crucial for clearing toxic proteins that gunk up the brains of those with Alzheimer’s, and that chronic stress is linked to harmful inflammation that is a villain in many brain diseases.

Question Number 10

Question Number 10

Your daughter comments that you haven’t remembered things that her children tell you, and she’s not sure if you’re not listening or need your ears checked. Is it Sign of Alzheimer’s or normal ageing?

Correct Answer

Correct Answer: Sign of Alzheimer’s

There is a lot of grey areas here, and certainly not hearing someone in the first place is quite different from not being able to remember what he or she said. New research shows that hearing loss can be an early indicator of worsening cognitive performance in older adults. In one new study, for instance, 800 cognitively healthy 50- and 60-year-olds who were found to have hearing loss were up to three times more likely to have developed mild cognitive impairment (the earliest stage of Alzheimer’s) four years later than were those without hearing loss. And Taylor Francis, a University of Wisconsin researcher who conducted the study using 800 volunteer subjects, notes that a doubling of risk remained for the hearing loss group even after controlling for factors like depression, level of social interaction, genetic predisposition and hypertension. While Francis says it’s too soon to tell if treating hearing loss could prevent dementia, we’re going to mark this as a “Sign of Alzheimer’s”to motivate you to go get that hearing checked.

Heart Touching Video of Alzheimer’s Diseased Mother

A couple of days ago on YouTube, I had found a heart touching video of a mother who was suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease. His son Joe Joe has opened a YouTube channel and regularly updated his mother’s recorded video on the channel.

If you have time see the full video, you will be touched with emotion.

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